Wednesday, March 30, 2011

NISGUA Tour Underway! 2011 Itinerary

Listado de actividades en espanol.

Our most recently updated itinerary can be found on our website www.nisgua.org.

MINING AND VIOLENCE IN GUATEMALA:
INDIGENOUS WOMEN RESIST

2011 Speaking Tour with Tz’ununija’ Indigenous Women’s Movement

March 28 - April 14, 2011

NEW YORK CITY AND NEW JERSEY: MARCH 28-31

March 28, Monday
11:30am: Lunch with Community Friends in Action
               Grace Lutheran Church,
               9 E. Homestead Ave., Palisades Park, NJ 07650

7:00pm: Presentation at Bluestockings Bookstore
             172 Allen Street, New York, NY 10002

March 29, Tuesday
6:00-8:00am: WBAI Radio Show, http://stream.wbai.org/

4:00-6:00pm: Presentation at New York University
                     Department of Social & Cultural Analysis
                     20 Cooper Sq. 4th Floor, New York, NY

6:30pm: Presentation at 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East
             Panel on Mexico, Cuba, and Guatemala
             310 W 43rd St., New York, NY 10036

March 30, Wednesday
10:30am: Presentation at New York University
              Class on “Indigenous Feminisms”
              King Juan Carlos Center, Room 404
              53 Washington Square South, New York, NY

March 31, Thursday
9:20am: WBAI's First Voices Indigenous Radio
             with Tiokasin Ghorthorse
              http://stream.wbai.org/

11:30am-12:30pm: Meeting with American Jewish World Service (Closed)

ROCHESTER, NY: APRIL 1-2
April 1, Friday
6:00 - 8:00pm: Presentation at University of Rochester
                       Presentation will be filmed by Indy Media
                       Dewey Hall 1 – 101, Rochester, NY

April 2, Saturday
1:00pm: Interview with Indy Media

4:30-6:30pm: Potluck dinner with local organizations.
                     NISGUA activist Marilyn Anderson’s house

7:00-9:00pm: Presentation
                     First Unitarian Church of Rochester
                     220 Winton Road South, Rochester, NY 14610

NEW HAMPSHIRE: APRIL 4-5

April 4, Monday
10:30am: Presentation at Marlboro College
              Spanish Classes of Professor Rosario DeSwanson
              Marlboro College, 2582 South Road, Marlboro, VT
              Followed by lunch at 12:50pm

5:30pm: Potluck dinner (Closed)
             United Church of Christ

6:30pm: Presentation taped for Community Access TV
             Open to public, enter building at rear
             United Church of Christ

April 5, Tuesday
8:30am: Meeting with Professor Abigail Abrash-Walton
             Environmental Studies Department
            Antioch New England University, Room 1B
            40 Avon Street, Keene, NH

10:00am: Presentation at Keene State College
               Spanish Class of Professor Patricia Pedroza (room TBA)
               229 Main Street, Keene, NH

2:00 or 2:45pm (Time TBA): TV show recording
              Veterans For Peace
               Manchester, NH

7:00pm: Dinner then presentation
            Manchester Unitarian Universalist Church
            669 Union Street, Manchester, NH

April 6, Wednesday
8:00 or 8:30am (Time TBA):
           Presentation at Southern New Hampshire University
           Dr. Aysun Ficici’s International Business classes
           2500 N. River Road, Manchester, NH

BOSTON: APRIL 6

April 6, Wednesday
1:30 – 3:00pm: Presentation for first Wednesday series
                        Grassroots International in Boston, MA (Closed)

7:00 - 9:00pm: Presentation and discussion
                       Needham Congregational Church
                       1154 Great Plain Avenue, Needham, MA 02492

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND: APRIL 7-9

April 7, Thursday
4:00 – 6:00pm: Presentation at Providence College
                       1 Cunningham Square, Providence, RI

6:30pm: Presentation at English For Action
             Voz Mujer Class

April 8, Friday
6:30pm: Presentation at English For Action
            "Action Committee" Sponsored Event

April 9, Saturday
9:00-11:00am: Event with Organización Maya K'iche USA
                      1162 Acushnet Ave, New Bedford, MA

WASHINGTON DC, BALTIMORE
APPALACHIA: APRIL 10 – 12

April 10, Sunday

10:00am: Latin America Solidarity Coalition Conference
               Workshops on strategies to end militarism
               NISGUA and Tz'ununija' will be attending
               Register at: http://www.lasolidarity.org/

2:45pm: SOA Watch March
             More information at: http://soaw.org/  

7:00-10:00pm: Dinner/fundraiser/presentation
                       Home of Amanda Kistler
                       Former NISGUA Accompanier
                       1450 Newton St NW, Washington, DC
                       Please email amanda.kistler[at]gmail to RSVP

April 11, Monday
12:00pm: Brownbag lunch
              Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL)
              Co-sponsored by Earthworks (No Dirty Gold Campaign)
              1350 Connecticut Avenue NW
              Suite #1100, Washington, DC 20036

2:00pm: Presentation at American University
             Kay Lounge
             4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC

4:30pm: Presentation at Johns Hopkins University
             Rome Building, Room 812
             1619 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC

7:00pm - Red Emma’s Bookstore
               800 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202

April 12, Tuesday
Exchange with Southern Appalachia Mountain Stewards and tour of mountaintop removal mine site in Virginia (Closed). Learn more about SAMS VA’s work: http://www.samsva.org/

NORTH CAROLINA: APRIL 13-14

April 13, Wednesday
12:00pm: Presentation at Duke University
             Sponsored by the
             Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
             Durham, NC 27708

7:00pm: Presentation at Wake Forest University
             Sponsored by
             Latin American and Latino Studies
             1834 Wake Forest Road, Winston-Salem NC 27106

April 14, Thursday
10:00am: Presentation with the Center for New North Carolinians
            University of North Carolina at Greensboro
            413 S. Edgeworth St, Greensboro, NC

Se celebra consulta comunitaria en San Martín Chile Verde - San Martín Chile Verde celebrates community referendum

A man prepares to vote in Caserío Tui Bul. Graham Hunt
Un hombre se prepara para emitir su voto en el Caserío Tui Bul.

On March 16, 2011, 17,849 residents of the predominantly Maya Mam municipality of San Martín "Chile Verde" Sacatepéquez, Quetzaltenango, added their voices to those of the roughly 600,000 people across Guatemala who have rejected the imposition of mining and hydroelectric megaprojects in their communities in more than 50 good faith community referenda.  As reported in La Prensa Libre, an undisclosed company planning to build a hydroelectric plant in the area approached the municipal government for authorization; in response, the municipal mayor, Martín Vásquez, decided to place the decision in the hands of the population.  63 people voted in favor of allowing mining and hydroelectric companies to operate in the municipality.

El 16 de marzo, 2011, 17 849 residentes del municipio mayoritariamente maya mam de San Martín "Chile Verde" Sacatepéquez, Quetzaltenango,sumaron sus voces a las de unas 600 000 personas de Guatemala quienes han rechazado la imposición proyectos hidroeléctricos y mineros en sus communiidades a través de más de 50 consultas comunitarias de buena fe.  Como se reportó en La Prensa Libre, una compañía, cuyo nombre no fue publicado, con planes de construir una planta hidroeléctrica en el área, hizo un acercamiento al gobierno municpal para pedir autorización; en respuesta, el alcalde municpal, Martín Vásquez, decidió dejar la decisión en las manos de la población.  63 personas votaron a favor de dejar a compañías mineras e hidroeléctricas operar en el municipio. 


A member of the auxiliary mayor's office looks on as residents vote in Caserío Tui Bul. Graham Hunt
Un miembro de la alcaldía auxiliar observa mientras residentes emiten su voto en el Caserío Tui Bul.

Graham Hunt

Manuel Vaíl Mateo, representative of the municipality of Huitán, Quetzaltenango, and member of the Regional Council of Ancestral Authorities of the West, speaks with the public in the community of Loblatzán about the central government's effort to regulate community consultations. Graham Hunt
Manuel Vail Mateo, representante del municipio de Huitán, Quetzaltenango, y miembro del Consejo Regional de Autoridades Ancestrales de Occidente, se dirige al publico en la comunidad de Loblatzán, dando a conocer la intencion del gobierno central de reglamentar las consultas comunitarias.

The referendum was carried out in the midst of growing national tensions regarding an initiative by the central government to regulate community referenda in Guatemala.  During the unveiling of the initiative on February 23, 2010, the government announced that civil society organizations would have 30 working days to submit revisions to the proposed legislation.  As reported in a previous post on this blog, organizations and communities from around the country have rejected the government's present attempt to regulate community consultations, denouncing that the proposed legislation was redacted at the behest of business interests and without the participation of the communities to be affected.

La consulta se llevó a cabo entremedio de tensiones nacionales crecientes en torno a una iniciativa del gobierno central para regular las consultas comunitarias en Guatemala.  Durante el desvelo de la iniciativa el 23 de febrero, 2010, el gobierno anunció que las organizaciones de la sociedad civil tendrían 30 días hábiles para entregar sus revisiones a la legislación propuesta.  Como se reportó en una entrada previa a este blog, organizaciones y comunidades de muchas zonas del país han rechazado el intento del gobierno de normar las consultas, denunciando que la legislación propuesta fue redactada a instancias de la empresa privada y sin la participación de las comunidades que serían afectadas.

A community leader from Cabricán, Quetzaltenango, spoke to the public in Lablatzán. Graham Hunt
Una lideresa comunitara de Cabricán, Quetzaltenango, impartió un mensaje al público en Lablatzán.


Observers and volunteers eat lunch in San Martín's market. Graham Hunt
Observadores y voluntarios almuerzan en el mercado de San Martín.

The banner, placed by local teachers, reads "This March 16 say no to the sale of our  Mother Earth." Graham Hunt
La pancarta, colocada por el magisterio local, dice "Este 16 de marzo digamos
no a la venta de nuestra Madre Tierra."


A resident votes in the center of San Martín. Graham Hunt
Un residente vota en el centro de San Martín.
A woman marks her ballot in the center of San Martín while volunteers stand by to guarantee her right to a secret vote. Graham Hunt
Una mujer marca su papeleta en el centro de San Martín mientras voluntarios velan por su derecho al voto secreto..

Community mayors oversaw the voting in central San Martín. Graham Hunt
Alcaldes comunitarios custodiaban las votaciones en el centro de San Martín.

A young voter receives her ballot in central San Martín. Graham Hunt
Una votante joven recibe su papeleta en el centro de San Martín.

Graham Hunt

Residents and visitors were invited to leave messages for the people of San Martín. Graham Hunt
A residentes y visitantes se les invitó que dejaran un mensaje al pueblo de San Martín.

Graham Hunt

A delegation from the Council of Elders of San Juan Ostuncalco visited San Martín. Graham Hunt
Una delegación del Consejo de Ancianos de San Juan Ostuncalco visitó a San Martín.

A member of the Council of Elders of San Juan Ostuncalco speaks to the public. Graham Hunt
Una representante del Consejo de Ancianos de San Juan Ostuncalco se dirige al público.

A soccer game in the central plaza of San Martín. Graham Hunt
Un partido de futból en la plaza central de San Martín.

A banner hung above the road leading out of San Martín reads "We need to live!" and features a ballot marked "No" to prospective megaprojects in the municipality. Graham Hunt
Una pancarta colgada sobre la salida de San Martín dice "¡Necesitamos Vivir!" y despliega una papeleta marcada "No" en contra de prospectivos megaproyectos en el municipio.

.

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Evictions in Polochic Valley Denounced


Representatives from numerous organizations held a press conference on March 18 to denounce human rights violations committed during the eviction of hundreds of rural Maya Q'eqchi' families in the Polochic Valley, in the department of Alta Verapaz and to demand that the authorities halt the evictions.   The organizations addressed a letter of protest to Ban Ki-Moon, Secretary General of the United Nations, who was visiting in Guatemala while the evictions were being carried out.

According to the Campesino Unity Committee (CUC) and the National Coordinating Committee of Campesino Organizations (CNOC), in spite of all parties having agreed to resolve the land conflict in Polochic through dialogue on March 14, one day later, on March 15, the authorities started evicting more than 8 communities with hundreds of families.  The families were living on the land of the sugar and African palm company Chabil Utzaj, owned by Carlos Widmann of one of the most economically powerful families in Guatemala.

During the evictions, a number of people were injured and Antonio Beb Ac died of severe head wounds.

Hundreds of National Civil Police officers and soldiers carried out the evictions, using tear gas on the population while company tractors destroyed the communities' crops.  The campesino organizations at the press conference said the burning of crops violates the communities' right to food security and is reminiscent of the "scorched earth" tactics used by the army during the counterinsurgency campaign of the 1980s.  A representative of the Integral Rural Development Alliance (ADRI) said that witnesses also observed armed men in civilian clothes from neighboring communities participate in the evictions.  Some of the men were later seen getting into police and army vehicles to put on uniforms.

The contested land in the Polochic region was acquired through a loan by the Central American Economic Integration Bank (BCIE) and handed over to agro-business companies like Chabil Utzaj.  During the administration of former President Oscar Berger, the company moved its major sugar refinery from Escuintla to Alta Verapaz.  In August of 2010, the media announced that Guatemala's Industrial Bank was planning to auction off Chabil Utzaj's 37 plantations in Alta Verapaz and the refinery closed. Campesino families decided to occupy additional land, which some families have historical ties to and where some families had been living for a long time, and ask the government to negotiate a deal.  According to El Periódico, the company's spokesperson has now said the news about the auction was false and that foreign business partners are currently waiting for the evictions to be carried out on the 12 plantations as ordered in order to reopen operations.  The BCIE recently announced a restructuring of the original loan with new investment from Guatemala Sugar State Corp.

The organizations at the press conference mentioned the links between the Widmann family and former President Berger, as well as possible alliances between the current government and the Widmann family in this year's electoral process,  as conflicts of interest, proposing that the State buy the land and hand it over to the Maya Q'eqchi' families currently living in poverty and extreme poverty on land that had been abandoned by the company.

For more information:
  • Fundacion Guillermo Toriello: http://www.fgtoriello.org.gt/
  • Comite de Unidad Campesina: http://www.cuc.org.gt/es/
  • Union Verapacense de Organizaciones Campesinas: http://uvocguatemala.blogspot.com/
  • Coordinadora Nacional Indigena y Campesina: http://www.mayaconic.org/

Denuncian desalojos del Valle del Polochic, Alta Verapaz


Representantes de diversas organizaciones sociales dieron una conferencia de prensa el 18 de marzo de 2011, para denunciar las violaciones de derechos humanos cometidas esta semana y para exigir que se detengan los desalojos de comunidades campesinas q'eqchi's en la región del Valle del Polochic, departamento de Alta Verapaz. Dirigieron una carta de protesta al Señor Ban Ki-Moon, Secretario General de las Nacionaes Unidas, quien estaba de visita en Guatemala mientras se realizaron los desalojos.

Según informan las organizaciones campesinas Comité de Unidad Campesina (CUC) y la Coordinadora Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas (CNOC), a pesar de haber reunido una mesa de díalogo el 14 de marzo, los desalojos empezaron el 15 de marzo en contra de más de 8 comunidades de centenares de familias asentadas en tierras de la empresa azucarera y palmera Chabil Utzaj, propiedad del empresario Carlos Widmann de una de las familias más economicamente poderosas en Guatemala. 

Se han confirmado varias personas heridas y la muerte del comunitario Antonio Beb Ac, quien se murio de lesiones graves.

Centenares de efectivos de la Policia Nacional Civil y del Ejercito han efectuado los desalojos, utilizando gases lacrimógenas en contra de la población y tractores de la empresa para destruir los cultivos de las comunidades, acción calificada por las organizaciones campesinas como una violación al derecho a la seguridad alimentaria y como un retorno a la táctica de "tierra arrasada" implementada por el Ejercito Guatemalateco en su campaña contrainsurgente durante la década de los 80.  Además un representante de la Alianza por el Desarrollo Rural Integral (ADRI) señala la participación de cuerpos paramilitares en los desalojos, conformados por personas armadas vestidas de civil que participaron en los desalojos y posteriormente entraron a vehículos de la Policia y el Ejercito para ponerse los uniformes de estas instituciones estatales.

Las tierras bajo conflicto en la región del Polochic fueron adqueridas con un préstamo del Banco Centroamericano de Integración Económica (BCIE) y entregadas a empresas agroindustriales, entre ellas el ingenio Chabil Utzaj, que durante la administración del Presidente Oscar Berger, trasladó su Ingenio Guadalupe de Escuintla a Alta Verapaz. En agosto de 2010, salió que el Banco Industrial subastaría las 37 fincas de Chabil Utzaj en Alta Verapaz y el ingenio se quedó cerrado.  Familias campesinas ocuparon las fincas, sobre las cuales algunas de las familias tienen reclamos historicos y en donde otras han vivido por mucho tiempo, y pidieron una negociación con el Gobierno.  En El Periódico, el vocero de la empresa manifestó que la noticia de la subasta fue errónea y que socios extranjeros esperan el cumplimiento de las órdenes de desalojo en las 12 fincas para reanudar labores.  El préstamo fue reestructurado por el BCIE recientemente con la ayuda del nuevo inversionista Guatemala Sugar State Corp.

Las organizaciones señalaron que los vínculos familiares del finquero Carlos Widmann con el ex-Presidente Berger, además los supuestos vínculos con el gobierno actual en la campaña electoral, generan un conflicto de interés en este proceso. La propuesta de las organizaciones campesinas es que el gobierno de Guatemala compre estas tierras para entregárselas luego a comunidades campesinas q'eqchi's sin tierra que actualmente viven en la pobreza y la extrema pobreza.
Para mas informacion:
  • Fundacion Guillermo Toriello: http://www.fgtoriello.org.gt/
  • Comite de Unidad Campesina: http://www.cuc.org.gt/es/
  • Union Verapacense de Organizaciones Campesinas: http://uvocguatemala.blogspot.com/
  • Coordinadora Nacional Indigena y Campesina: http://www.mayaconic.org/

Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Violencia subraya la necesidad para una suspensión temporaria de la mina Marlin de Goldcorp


En la siguiente carte dirigida a las autoridades Guatemalecas y Goldcorp Inc., la Coalición en contra la Minería Injusta de Guatemala (CAMIGUA) expresa su profunda preocupación en relación a los informes sobre la violencia ocurrida el 28 de febrero de 2011 en la municipalidad de San Miguel Ixtahuacán. CAMIGUA entiende que eventos como los ocurridos el 28 de febrero subrayan la necesidad de que las medidas cautelares emitidas por la CIDH en el mes de mayo 2011 sean implementadas en su totalidad, que incluyen la suspensión temporaria de la mina Marlin. En lugar de la acción inmediata del gobierno, solicitamos que Goldcorp dé este paso voluntariamente y cumpla con su compromiso de respetar los derechos humanos.
_____________________________________________________

9 de marzo de 2011

Ruth del Valle Cóbar, Msc., Presidenta
Comisión Presidencial coordinadora de la Política del Ejecutivo en materia de Derechos Humanos (COPREDEH)
2 Ave. 10-50, Zona 9
Guatemala

Charles Jeannes, Presidente y Gerente General
Goldcorp Inc.
Park Place,Ste. 3400-666 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C. V6C 2X8

Estimada y estimado Sra. del Valle y Sr. Jeannes:

La Coalición Internacional Contra la Minería Injusta en Guatemala (CAMIGUA) y entes aliados deseamos expresar nuestra profunda preocupación en relación a los informes sobre la violencia ocurrida el 28 de febrero de 2011 en la municipalidad de San Miguel Ixtahuacán. Los presuntos incidentes tuvieron lugar después de un día de acción organizado por miembros de la comunidad para exhortar a las autoridades guatemaltecas a implementar las medidas cautelares MC-260-07, emitidas el 20 de mayo de 2010 por la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH). Estas medidas, que incluyen la suspensión temporaria de la mina Marlin, tienen por objeto otorgar inmediata seguridad y protección a la salud y a la integridad personal de las comunidades indígenas en las municipalidades de Sipacapa y de San Miguel Ixtahuacán. Las mismas medidas también tienen el propósito de proteger los derechos de las comunidades mientras la CIDH evalúa las alegaciones de violaciones a los derechos humanos relacionadas con la mina. Aunque el Presidente Álvaro Colom indicó públicamente que su gobierno cumpliría con la recomendación de la CIDH, [1] la mina continúa operando.

CAMIGUA entiende que eventos como los ocurridos el 28 de febrero subrayan la necesidad de que las medidas cautelares emitidas por la CIDH sean implementadas en su totalidad. La falta de tratamiento de las quejas subyacentes en relación a la mina Marlin genera conflicto y fomenta las condiciones en las que la violencia puede tener lugar, tal como se ha observado en el informe sobre los derechos humanos comisionado por la empresa Goldcorp. [2] Por lo tanto, instamos al gobierno de Guatemala a que implemente las medidas cautelares en su totalidad y suspenda las operaciones de la mina Marlin. En lugar de la acción inmediata del gobierno, solicitamos que Goldcorp dé este paso voluntariamente y cumpla con su compromiso de respetar los derechos humanos. También pedimos a las autoridades guatemaltecas que garanticen la protección de la integridad física de los defensores de derechos humanos en San Miguel Ixtahuacán, y que investiguen cabalmente todos los abusos reportados en contra de estos defensores según sus obligaciones bajo el cuerpo de ley que abarca los derechos humanos.

En sus estados financieros y análisis adjuntos recientemente revelados, la compañía sostiene que "bajo la ley guatemalteca no hay fundamentos para suspender las operaciones en Marlin" y que hacerlo tendría un "efecto adverso... sobre sus empleados, sus proveedores y las comunidades." [3] Guatemala es parte de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos y, por consiguiente, al estado guatemalteco le incumbe implementar las recomendaciones de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos. Además, aunque una suspensión temporaria de la mina Marlin tuviera un efecto adverso sobre empleados, proveedores y comunidades, la compañía sería absolutamente capaz de solventar los costos de dicha suspensión y de garantizar que quienes pudieran ser afectados no sufrieran excesivas dificultades. Según los estados financieros de Goldcorp para el año 2010, [4] durante dicho año la mina Marlin fue la segunda fuente de ganancias más importante de la compañía. [5] De hecho, el total de activos de la compañía en 2010 [6] supera en la actualidad al PBI de Guatemala. [7]

Estamos profundamente preocupados por lo ocurrido el 28 de febrero de 2011, por las persistentes tensiones en las comunidades de San Miguel Ixtahuacán, y por las constantes amenazas a defensores de derechos humanos que se oponen a la mina Marlin. A pesar de los esfuerzos del gobierno de Guatemala por llamar a ciertos participantes al diálogo, este último conflicto es una indicación de que las quejas de las comunidades afectadas aún no se han atendido adecuadamente. Creemos que un proceso transparente para tratar las quejas de las comunidades no podrá llevarse a cabo hasta que se implementen en su totalidad las medidas cautelares emitidas por la CIDH, incluyendo la suspensión temporaria de la mina Marlin.

Creemos que la suspensión de la mina Marlin, sea impuesta inmediatamente por el gobierno guatemalteco o aceptada voluntariamente por la compañía, sería un paso importante para el tratamiento de las tensiones existentes en San Miguel Ixtahuacán, y para garantizar que los intereses económicos no se impongan una vez más sobre la seguridad y el bienestar de las comunidades indígenas de Guatemala. CAMIGUA y sus entes aliados también piden al gobierno de Guatemala que investigue plenamente los eventos ocurridos el 28 de febrero, que actúe para proteger a los defensores de derechos humanos y que implemente inmediatamente las medidas cautelares.

Atentamente,

Atlantic Regional Solidarity Network (Canada)
BC CASA/Café Justicia BC
Casa Maiz-Toronto
Center for International Environmental Law (US)
Collectif Guatemala (France)
FoodFirst Information and Action Network
Guatemala Community Network-Toronto
Guatemala Human Rights Commission/USA
Interamerican Association for Environmental Defense (AIDA)
LACASA, Latino American Canadian Solidarity Association (London, Ontario, Canada)
Latin America Working Group/USA
London Guatemalan Solidarity Committee (London, Ontario, Canada)
Maritimes-Guatemala Breaking the Silence Solidarity Network
MiningWatch Canada
NISGUA/Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala (US)
Plataforma Holandesa Contra la Impunidad en Guatemala
Public Service Alliance of Canada
Mining Injustice Solidarity Network, Toronto
Rights Action (Canada & USA)
The Social Justice Committee of Montreal
Solidarity of Austria with Guatemala

Información sobre los eventos sucedidos el 28 de febrero de 2011


De acuerdo a los relatos de primera mano, doscientas personas se manifestaron pacíficamente durante la jornada del 28 de febrero de 2011 para demandar la implementación completa de las medidas cautelares emitidas por la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) el 20 de mayo de 2010. Al disolverse la protesta, miembros de la comunidad San José Ixcaniche, Salitre y Siete Platos a favor de la mina Marlin agredieron a los manifestantes, y detuvieron a algunos sin su consentimiento hasta que aceptaran firmar confesiones y pagarles a quienes los habían detenido.

El 1 de marzo de 2011, Goldcorp publicó su propia declaración en relación a los sucesos ocurridos el 28 de febrero. Investigaciones más profundas sobre estos hechos, incluyendo la realizada por Amnistía Internacional, indican que esta versión de los hechos es incompleta, imprecisa y que podría poner en peligro la seguridad personal de un reconocido defensor de derechos humanos, Aniseto López.

Uno de los heridos el 28 de febrero fue el bien conocido defensor de derechos humanos Miguel Bámaca, quien fue golpeado y abandonado cerca de su casa con heridas graves. La Comisión Presidencial coordinadora de la Política del Ejecutivo en materia de Derechos Humanos (COPREDEH) ya había autorizado medidas cautelares para Miguel Bámaca como consecuencia de previos atentados contra su vida. Cuando Aniseto López trató de regresar para asistir a Miguel, fue detenido y golpeado. Los informes de los que presenciaron el hecho indican que le pegaron en la cara y que lo amenazaron.

El pronunciamiento de Goldcorp destaca repetidamente a Aniseto López como líder de la protesta. Esta no es la primera vez que se pone en la mira al señor López. Cuando testificó frente a la CIDH durante una audiencia sobre defensores ambientalistas en octubre de 2010, Aniseto fue acusado formalmente de haber atacado a un hombre durante la manifestación por el Día de la Tierra en San Marcos, a pesar de haber estado participando en la audiencia en la Ciudad de Guatemala, a siete horas de distancia. Tal como lo ha observado repetidamente la CIDH en este y otros casos similares en Guatemala, este tipo de acusaciones puede poner en gran peligro la seguridad personal de defensores y defensoras de los derechos humanos.

Asimismo, los informes de los allí presentes indican que un autobús, contratado para transportar a aproximadamente 45 manifestantes a sus hogares, fue detenido al llegar a la comunidad de San José Ixcaniche. Moradores de la comunidad obligaron a los manifestantes a descender del bus y los agredieron. [8] Algunos manifestantes intentaron escapar. En total, se ha informado que trece personas resultaron heridas incluyendo doce manifestantes, uno de los cuales fue hospitalizado, y una mujer, que fue atendida en la clínica médica de la mina Marlin. Además, de acuerdo con las informaciones, los manifestantes fueron despojados de sus teléfonos, cámaras fotográficas, filmadoras, casetes y cintas.

Aunque se alertó de los hechos a la policía tanto de San Marcos como de San Miguel Ixtahuacán, dichas autoridades señalaron por teléfono que no enviarían unidades al área, en parte porque temían a quienes retenían a los manifestantes. Para obtener su propia liberación, según la información disponible, los captores forzaron a los manifestantes a firmar documentos en los que confesaban ciertos hechos. Lamentamos que Goldcorp se base en estas confesiones forzadas en lugar de emprender una investigación cuidadosa de la situación como lo requieren los estándares de diligencia debida.

Con copia para:

Santiago Cantón, Secretario Ejecutivo
Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos

Lcda. Claudia Paz y Paz Bailey
Fiscal General de la República y Jefa del Ministerio Público

Dr. Sergio Fernando Morales Alvarado
Procurador de los Derechos Humanos de Guatemala (PDH)

Claudia Samayoa, Coordinadora
Unidad de Protección a Defensoras y Defensores de Derechos Humanos - Guatemala (UDEFEGUA)

David Diesley, Vicepresidente Ejecutivo, Asuntos Corporativos y Asesoría General
Goldcorp Inc.

Sra. Evelyne Coulombe, Encargada de Negocios
Embajada de Canadá en Guatemala

Lic. Georges de La Roche, Embajador
Embajada de Guatemala en Canadá

Junta Directiva
Goldcorp Inc.

[1] Presidencia de la República, Comisión Presidencial coordinadora de la Política del Ejecutivo en materia de Derechos Humanos, Informe P-1018-2010/RDVC/HEMJ/ad, 23 de junio de 2010
[2] On Common Ground Consultants Inc., " Evaluación de los Derechos Humanos de la Mina Marlin de Goldcorp: Resumen Ejecutivo", mayo de 2010. ("La principal inquietud de los grupos de interés está relacionada con el contexto de conflicto, las tensiones y la fragmentación en las comunidades afectadas por el proyecto... Un círculo vicioso ocurre cuando los conflictos dan cabida a violaciones e infracciones de los derechos humanos, que a su vez llevan a más conflictos.")
[3] Discusión y Análisis de la Condición Financiera y de los resultados de las Operaciones para el año finalizado el 31 de diciembre de 2010, realizado por la Gerencia de Goldcorp. Consultado en sedar.com, el 27 de febrero de 2011.
[4] Ibid.
[5] Goldcorp declaró 268,6 millones de dólares canadienses como ganancia proveniente de la mina Marlin en 2010, aproximadamente un 18% del total de ganancias producidas por todas sus operaciones durante el último año. Ver Discusión y Análisis de la Condición Financiera y de los resultados de las Operaciones para el año finalizado el 31 de diciembre de 2010, realizado por la Gerencia de Goldcorp. Consultado en sedar.com, el 27 de febrero de 2011.
[6] El total de activos de Goldcorp en 2010 fue de 28,8 miles de millones de dólares canadienses. Ver Discusión y Análisis de la Condición Financiera y de los resultados de las Operaciones para el año finalizado el 31 de diciembre de 2010, realizado por la Gerencia de Goldcorp. Consultado en sedar.com, el 27 de febrero de 2011.
[7] Según el Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos, el PBI de Guatemala en 2009 fue de 23,7 miles de millones de dólares estadounidenses. Página web consultado el 1 de marzo de 2011.
[8] Amnistía Internacional, Acción Urgente 57/11, "Guatemala: activistas mineros golpeados y amenazados"

Violence Near Goldcorp Mine in Guatemala Underscores Need for Mine Suspension

In the following letter to Guatemalan authorities and Goldcorp Inc., the Coalition Against Unjust Mining in Guatemala (CAMIGUA) expresses its profound concern following reports of violence in the municipality of San Miguel Ixtahuacán. CAMIGUA believes that the recent incident underscores an urgent need for the Guatemalan government to fully implement precautionary measures issued by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) last spring, including temporary closure of Goldcorp's Marlin mine. In lieu of immediate government action, the coalition requests that Goldcorp voluntarily take this step and fulfill its stated commitment to respect human rights.
______________________________________________

March 9, 2011

Ruth del Valle Cóbar, Msc., President
Presidential Commission for Coordinating Executive Policy in the Field of Human Rights (COPREDEH)
2 Ave. 10-50, Zona 9
Guatemala

Charles Jeannes, President and Chief Executive Officer
Goldcorp Inc.
Park Place, Ste. 3400-666 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C. V6C 2X8

Dear Ms. del Valle and Mr. Jeannes:

The Coalition Against Unjust Mining in Guatemala (CAMIGUA) and allies would like to express our profound concern following reports of violence in the municipality of San Miguel Ixtahuacán on February 28th 2011. The alleged incidents took place after a day of action organized by community members to urge Guatemalan authorities to implement precautionary measures, MC-260-07, issued by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) on May 20th 2010. These measures, including the temporary suspension of the Marlin mine, are intended to provide immediate security and protection for the health and personal integrity of indigenous communities in the municipalities of Sipacapa and San Miguel Ixtahuacán. They are also intended to protect the communities’ rights while the IACHR examines alleged human rights violations stemming from the mine. Although President Álvaro Colóm publicly indicated his government would comply with the IACHR’s recommendation, [1] the mine continues to operate.

We believe that events such as those on February 28th underline the necessity for the Guatemalan government to fully implement the IACHR precautionary measures. Failure to address the underlying grievances about the Marlin mine generates conflict and fosters conditions within which violence can take place, as pointed out in Goldcorp’s own Human Rights Assessment. [2] We therefore urge the Government of Guatemala to comply with the precautionary measures and suspend operations at the Marlin mine. In lieu of immediate government action, we request that Goldcorp voluntarily take this step and fulfill its commitment to respecting human rights. We also ask Guatemalan authorities to ensure protection for the physical integrity of human rights defenders in San Miguel Ixtahuacán and to fully investigate all reported abuses against these defenders in accordance with its obligations under human rights law.

Goldcorp argues in its recently disclosed financial statements and accompanying analysis that “there is no basis under Guatemalan law to suspend operations at Marlin” and that to do so would have an “adverse effect... on its employees, suppliers, and the communities.” [3] Guatemala is party to the American Convention on Human Rights and, as a result, it is incumbent on the Guatemalan state to implement the recommendations of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Furthermore, to the extent that a temporary suspension of the Marlin mine would have an adverse affect on employees, suppliers and communities, the company is fully capable of sustaining the costs of such a suspension and to ensure that others who might be affected do not suffer undue hardship as a result. According to Goldcorp's financial statements for 2010, [4] the Marlin mine was the company's second largest source of earnings in 2010. [5] Indeed, the company's total assets in 2010 [6] now exceed the GDP of Guatemala. [7]

We are deeply concerned by what took place on February 28th 2011, by persistent tensions in the communities of San Miguel Ixtahuacán, and by the ongoing situation of threats against human rights defenders opposed to the Marlin mine. Despite the efforts of the Government of Guatemala to convene a dialogue with selected participants, this recent conflict is an indication that neither the Guatemalan government nor Goldcorp have adequately addressed grievances of affected communities. We believe that a transparent process to address community grievances will not be able to take place until the precautionary measures issued by the IACHR are fully implemented, including the temporary suspension of the Marlin mine.

We believe the suspension of the Marlin mine, whether immediately enforced by the Guatemalan government or voluntarily by the company, would be a significant step to address existing tensions in San Miguel Ixtahuacán, and to ensure that economic interests do not once again come before the safety and wellbeing of indigenous communities in Guatemala. CAMIGUA and its allies also ask the Government of Guatemala to fully investigate the events of February 28th, to take action to protect human rights defenders, and to immediately implement the precautionary measures.

Sincerely,

Atlantic Regional Solidarity Network (Canada)
BC CASA/Café Justicia BC
Casa Maiz-Toronto
Center for International Environmental Law (US)
Collectif Guatemala (France)
FoodFirst Information and Action Network
Guatemala Community Network-Toronto
Guatemala Human Rights Commission/USA
Interamerican Association for Environmental Defense (AIDA)
LACASA, Latino American Canadian Solidarity Association. London Ontario, Canada
Latin America Working Group/USA
London Guatemalan Solidarity Committee. London Ontario, Canada
Maritimes-Guatemala Breaking the Silence Solidarity Network
MiningWatch Canada
NISGUA/Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala (US)
Plataforma Holandesa Contra la Impunidad en Guatemala
Public Service Alliance of Canada
Mining Injustice Solidarity Network, Toronto
Rights Action (Canada & USA)
The Social Justice Committee of Montreal
Solidarity of Austria with Guatemala

Background to events taking place February 28th 2011

According to eyewitness accounts, two hundred people protested peacefully during the day on February 28th 2011 to demand the full implementation of the precautionary measures issued by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on May 20, 2010. As the protest was disbanding, pro-mining community members from San Jose Ixcaniche, Siete Platos and Salitre assaulted the protesters, detaining some against their will until they agreed to sign confessions and pay those who were holding them.

On March 1, 2011, Goldcorp released its own statement regarding events occurring on February 28th. Further investigation of these events, including research by Amnesty International, indicates that this version of events is incomplete, inaccurate, and could possibly put in jeopardy the personal security of a recognized human rights defender, Aniseto López.

One of those injured was known human rights defender, Miguel Bámaca, who was beaten and left severely injured near his home. The Presidential Commission on Human Rights (COPREDEH) had already authorized precautionary measures for Miguel Bámaca as a result of previous attempts on his life. When Aniseto López tried to return to assist Miguel, he was detained and beaten. Reports from those present indicate that he was struck in the face and threatened.

Goldcorp’s statement repeatedly singles out Aniseto López as leader of the protest. This is not the first time Mr. López has been targeted. As he testified to the IACHR during a hearing on environmental defenders in October 2010, Aniseto was formally accused of assaulting a man in San Marcos during an Earth Day demonstration, despite being seven hours away in Guatemala City to attend a meeting. As the IACHR has repeatedly noted on this and similar situations in Guatemala, such accusations can put the security of human rights defenders in serious jeopardy.

Furthermore, reports by those present indicate that one bus, which was hired to transport approximately 45 protesters to their homes, was detained when it reached San Jose Ixcaniche. Community members there forced the protesters off the bus and assaulted them. [8] Some protesters tried to flee. In total, thirteen people have been reported injured, including a dozen protesters, one of whom was hospitalized, as well as a woman who was treated at the Marlin mine's medical clinic. Telephones, cameras, videos cameras, cassettes and tapes were also reportedly taken from the protesters.  

Although police in both San Marcos and San Miguel Ixtahuacán were informed of events, they indicated by phone that they would not send units to the area in part because they feared those who were holding the protesters. To secure their own release, the protesters were reportedly forced by their captors to sign documents confessing to certain events. We lament that Goldcorp is relying on these forced confessions instead of undertaking a careful investigation of the situation as required by standards of due diligence.

cc:

Santiago Canton, Executive Secretary
Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

Lic. Claudia Paz y paz Bailey
Attorney General and Chief of the Public Ministry

Dr. Sergio Fernando Morales Alvarado
Guatemalan Human Rights Ombudsman (PDH)

Claudia Samayoa, Director
Guatemalan Human Rights Defenders Protection Unit (UDEFEGUA)

David Diesley, Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs and General Counsel
Goldcorp Inc.

Mrs. Evelyne Coulombe Chargé d'affaires
Canadian Embassy in Guatemala

Licenciado Georges de La Roche Embajador
Guatemalan Embassy in Canada

Board of Directors
Goldcorp Inc.

[1] Presidencia de la República, Comisión Presidencial Coordinadora de la Política del Ejecutivo en Materia de Derechos Humanos, Informe P-1018-2010/RDVC/HEMJ/ad, 23 June 2010.
[2] On Common Ground Consultants Inc., “Human Rights Assessment of Goldcorp's Marlin Mine: Executive Summary,” 34 (2010) (“The number one stakeholder concern relates to the environment of conflict, tension, and fragmentation in the project-affected communities… A vicious circle is created when conflict leads to human rights violations and infringements, which in turn lead to further conflict.”).
[3] Goldcorp's Management's Discussion & Analysis of Financial Condition and results of Operations for the year ended December 31st 2010. Accessed on sedar.comon February 27th 2011.
[4] Ibid.
[5] Goldcorp reports earnings of $268.6 million CDN from the Marlin mine in 2010, or roughly 18% of total earnings from operations during the last year. See Goldcorp's Management's Discussion & Analysis of Financial Condition and results of Operations for the year ended December 31st 2010. Accessed on sedar.com on February 27th 2011.
[6] Goldcorp's total assets in 2010 were $28.8 billion CDN. See Goldcorp's Management's Discussion & Analysis of Financial Condition and results of Operations for the year ended December 31st 2010. Accessed on sedar.com on February 27th 2011.
[7] The GDP of Guatemala was $23.7 billion USD in 2009 according to the US State Department. Accessed March 1st 2011.
[8] Amnesty International, Urgent Action 57/11, “Guatemala: Mine Activists Beaten and Threatened”

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Communities reject initiative to regulate community referenda

A man waves a banner with the logo of the Comité de Unidad Campesina. Graham Hunt

In an interview with the Guatemalan newspaper Prensa Libre in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, Carlos Daniel de León of the Commerce and Investment Agency of Guatemala made known on February 19 that representatives of Guatemala's private sector had submitted to the executive branch of the government a proposal for a law that would regulate the carrying out of community referenda in Guatemala.  "The process is being evaluated," he explained, "so that not just anybody can have a community consultation, but that rather, in reality, it will be the institutions and in the adequate format."  He went on to clarify that "It has been a proposal of the private sector and is being evaluated by the Presidency--of the Republic--to to put systems in place to regulate the referendum process."

Graham Hunt
On February 23, president Álvaro Colom of the Unidad Nacional de Esperanza party convoked delegates of various sectors of civil society and private enterprise to the unveiling of the government's proposal for a law regulating community consultations.  As reported in a previous post regarding the good faith community referendum of San Juan Ostuncalco, on his visit to Guatemala in June 2010, U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights and Fundamental Liberties of Indigenous Peoples, James Anaya, denounced that since the ratification of ILO Convention 169 by the Guatemalan government in 1996, authorities have frequently taken the legal vacuum present with regards to its practical implementation as a lack of legal obligations to see to its application.  Indigenous organizations and communities, however, allege that the government's current proposal is a product of the initiative of private enterprise and, on February 23, denouncing that they are not being consulted as the government moves to regulate community referenda, the Consejo de Pueblos de Occidente (CPO), the Asamblea Departamental de Huehuetenango (ADH) the Consejo de Pueblos K'ichés (CPK), the Coordinación y Convergencia Nacional Maya Waqib' Kej,  the Comité de Unidad Campesina (CUC), the Coordinadora Nacional de Viudas de Guatemala (CONAVIGUA) and the collective MadreSelva, among other groups, staged a protest outside of the National Palace, site of the official meeting.

Members of the Consejo de Pueblos de Occidente (CPO) hold a banner featuring an image of U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Fundamental Rights of Indigenous Peoples, James Anaya, on his visit to Guatemala in June 2010.  Pancho Guindon.
In his preliminary observations regarding his june 13-18 visit to Guatemala, Anaya recognized that "the absence of a legislative and institutional framework has given rise to processes of consultation that are, to say the least, insufficient from the perspective of the international standards that recognize the rights of indigenous peoples."  He went on to say that "On the one hand, for some governmental sectors, the lack of internal regulation implies the absence of an effective obligation to consult.  From the perspective of international human rights law, nonetheless, this position is unsustainable.  The dispositions of Convention 169 are directly executable and of obligatory compliance by all public agents.  This conclusion has been confirmed by the jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court, which has expressly affirmed that consultation constitutes a fundamental right, part of the block of Constitutional rights--on a level with other rights recognized in the Constitution.  The argument as to the lack of an obligation to consult indigenous peoples has contributed greatly to the situation of grave legal insecurity of extractive activities and investment in the country."


"On the other hand," he continued, "there has come into being a debate as to the validity of the so-called good faith community referenda, referenda carried out by the very indigenous communities affected by mining or hydroelectic projects in application of the dispositions of the Municipal Code, and in the majority of which the communities have manifested themselves against such projects.  The Constitutional Court has interpreted that these referenda are not strictly binding given that municipalities do not have authority where mining is concerned.  In any case, I consider that the transcendence of community referenda does not exhaust itself with the question as to whether or not they are binding from the perspective of internal law.  These initiatives are valid and relevant to the degree that they constitute a reflection of the legitimate aspirations of indigenous communities to be listened to with relation to any project that may have an impact in their traditional territories."


He reiterated the need that a legal step be taken, affirming that "The regulation of referenda would grant these processes the greater legal certainty and security that are necessary for all action on the part of public powers.  Various international organisms, such as the Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), the Commission of Experts on the Application of International Conventions and Recommendations of the ILO and the Constitutional Court, itself, have declared themselves in this vein.  The majority of the interested actors, including various government ministries, organizations and indigenous peoples, along with the business sector, appear now to agree with the necessity of advancing urgently toward this objective."

Graham Hunt

As reported in the Prensa Libre and La Hora, the protest action in the capital was mirrored by a CPO/ADH press conference in the western department of Huehuetenango, where 30 of 32 municipalities have carried out community referenda in which the population has roundly rejected all types of mining operations.  As reported in the Prensa Libre, Francisco Morales of ADH expressed the groups rejection of the governmental initiative, saying that "Said regulation responds to the interests of the powerful classes, and therefore we won't allow it to enter into effect; the community consultations are not negotiable, because they come from the people and are true democratic processes that look to present the point of view of the population, principally regarding mining exploitation and the construction of hydroelectric dams and megaprojects."

The palace was guarded by a large delegation of officers of the National Civil Police force. Graham Hunt

In a press release, the Consejo de Pueblos de Occidente (CPO) manifested that "The intention to regulate the Right to Consultation contained in ILO Convention 169 is arbitrary, contradicts the very essence of this instrument and threatens, on the part of the State of Guatemala, principles of international law."  The CPO likewise expressed that "Should the regulation be passed, the spirit of the Convention shall be distorted, restricted and threatened in many of its intentions, thereby affecting fundamental rights of indigenous peoples contained in this international instrument, among them, the rights to consultation, forms of social organization and internal processes proper to indigenous peoples and the right to land."  CPO concluded that "We interpret this intention as a racist act of bad faith which, with an apparent desire that the State comply with its international obligations, disguises mechanisms that violate our rights and looks to consolidate individual national and foreign economic interests."  The CPO demanded that the executive branch of the government respect the referenda already carried out in indigenous territories, that indigenous communities' right to consultation be respected, and that the authorities desist in their attempt to regulate community consultations without the consent of the communities.

Graham Hunt

Similarly, in a press release, the Consejo de Pueblos K'ichés demanded that the government "Respect and not violate ancestral systems of consultation," that it "Respect the results of the good faith community referenda [already] realized throughout Ixim Uleu (the K'iché name for the territory which today comprises the nation of Guatemala)," and that it "Desist with its intent to 'regulate the process of consultations,' with the intentionality of the current proposal of the president of the republic."

Community mayors and heads of development boards holding varas, ceremonial staffs symbolic of community authority. Graham Hunt

For its part, the Coordinación y Convergencia Nacional Maya Waqib' Kej manifested by means of its own press release that "The exercise of consultation is an ancestral practice of indigenous peoples which has never been recognized by the State of Guatemala.  The present proposal to quicken the process of consultation of indigenous peoples corresponds to political and economic interests from the private sector and which oblige the government to limit indigenous rights to protect the transnational companies which currently are exploiting large extensions of land in Quiché, Huehuetenango, San Marcos, Sacatepéquez, Guatemala, Chimaltenango, Alta Verapaz, Jalapa, Jutiapa, Santa Rosa, Petén and Izabal, in short, the entire national territory.  Likewise, with this regulation the authorities are looking to guarantee for the future the continued exploitation of communal territories which historically belong to the indigenous Maya, Xinca and Garifuna peoples."

Graham Hunt

Organizations, among them the Consejo de Pueblos K'ichés, the Coordinadora Nacional de Viudas de Guatemala and the Coordinación y Convergencia Nacional Maya Waqib' Kej, were denied access to the national palace. Graham Hunt

Graham Hunt

Graham Hunt

President Colom of the Unidad Nacional de Esperanza party addresses the invitees to the official unveiling of the government's proposal to regulate community consultations in Guatemala. Pancho Guindon.

Members of the MadreSelva collective raised a banner demanding respect for the community referenda celebrated throughout Guatemala, strategically blocking the cameras of the television journalists filming the event. Pancho Guindon

Pancho Guindon

Having been denied entrance at the front of the Palace, the delegates requested permission to enter via the rear entrance.  Once again their request was denied, and lawyers accompanying the organizations filed a complaint before the Human Rights Ombudsman's office alleging they had been discriminated against as indigenous peoples. Graham Hunt

Graham Hunt

Graham Hunt

In an act of protest, community members burned a printed copy of the regulation proposed by the Colom administration. Graham Hunt

Comunidades rechazan iniciativa por normar las consultas comunitarias

Un hombre agita una bandera que lleva el logotipo del Comité de Unidad Campesina. Graham Hunt

En una entrevista con el diario guatemalteco la Prensa Libre en San Pedro Sula, Honduras, Carlos Daniel de León, de la Agencia de Comercio e Inversión de Guatemala, dio a conocer el 19 de febrero que representantes del sector privado en Guatemala habían entregado al gobierno ejecutivo una propuesta de ley que reglamentaría la realización de las consultas comunitarias en Guatemala. "Se está evaluando el proceso," explicó, "para que no cualquier persona pueda hacer una consulta popular, sino que en realidad sean las instituciones adecuadas y en el formato adecuado".  Llegó a clarificar que "Ha sido una propuesta hecha por el sector privado y está siendo evaluada en la Presidencia--de la República--, para operativizar un reglamento en el tema de consultas populares".

Graham Hunt
 
El 23 de Febrero, el Presidente de la República, Álvaro Colom, de la Unidad Nacional de Esperanza, convocó a varios sectores de la sociedad civil y de la empresa privada a la desvelación de una propuesta de ley, por parte del gobierno, para reglamentar las consultas comunitarias.  Como se reportó en una entrada previa a este blog tratándose de la consulta comunitaria de buena fe de San Juan Ostuncalco, a ocasión de su visita a Guatemala en junio del 2010, el Relator Especial de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos y Libertades Fundamentales de los Pueblos Indígenas, James Anaya, denunció que a partir de la ratificación del Convenio 169 de la OIT por el gobierno de Guatemala en 1996, las autoridades, con mucha frecuencia, han tomado el vacío legal imperante in cuanto a su implementación como una falta de obligaciones en cuanto a su aplicación.  Organizaciones y comunidades indígenas, sin embargo, alegan que la actual propuesta del gobierno se trata de una iniciativa de la empresa privada y, el 23 de febrero, denunciando que no se les está consultando mientras el gobierno procede a reglamentar el proceso de consulta, el Consejo de Pueblos de Occidente (CPO), la Asamblea Departamental de Huehuetenango (ADH), el Consejo de Pueblos K'ichés (CPK), la Coordinación y Convergencia nacional Maya Waqib' Kej, el Comité de Unidad Campesina (CUC), la Coordinadora nacional de Viudas de Guatemala (CONAVIGUA) y el colectivo MadreSelva, entre otras agrupaciones, montaron un plantón frente al Palacio nacional, sitio de la reunión oficial.

Miembros del Consejo de Pueblos de Occidente (CPO) sostienen una manta en la cual aparece una imagen del Relator Especial de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Fundamentales de los Pueblos Indígenas, James Anaya, en su visita a Guatemala en Junio del 2010. Pancho Guindon

En sus observaciones preliminares sobre su visita a Guatemala el 13 al 18 de junio de 2010, Anaya reconoció que "la ausencia de un marco legislativo e institucional en esta materia ha llevado a procesos de consulta que son, cuanto menos, insuficientes desde el punto de vista de los estándares internacionales que reconocen los derechos de los pueblos indígenas".  Procedió a decir que "Por un lado, para algunos sectores gubernamentales, la falta de reglamentación interna implica la ausencia de una obligación vigente de consultar.  Desde la perspectiva del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos, sin embergo, esta posición no es sostenible.  Las disposiciones del Convenio 169 son directamente ejecutables y de obligado cumplimiento por todos los agentes públicos.  Esta conslusión ha sido reforzada por la jurisprudencia de la Corte de Constitucionalidad, que ha afirmado expresamente que la consulta constituye un derecho fundamental, integrante del bloque de constitucionalidad, al mismo nivel que otros derechos reconocidos en la Constitución.  El argumento de la falta de obligatoriedad de la consulta a los pueblos indígenas ha contribuido en gran medida a la situación de grave inseguridad jurídica que afecta actualmente a las actividades extractivas y de inversión en el país".

"Por otra parte", continua, "se ha generado un debate sobre la validez o no de las llamadas consultas comunitarias de buena fe, consultas llevadas a cabo por las propias comunidades indígenas afectadas por la minería o por proyectos hidroeléctricos en aplicación de las disposiciones del Código Municipal, y en la mayoría de las cuales las comunidades se han manifestado en contra de estos proyectos. La Corte Constitucional ha interpretado que estas consultas no son estrictamente vinculantes debido a que los municipios no tienen competencia en materia de minería. En todo caso, considero que la trascendencia de las consultas comunitarias no se agota con la cuestión de que si son o no vinculantes desde la perspectiva del derecho interno. Estas iniciativas son válidas y tienen relevancia en la medida en que constituyen un reflejo de las aspiraciones legítimas de las comunidades indígenas a ser escuchadas en relación con todo proyecto que tenga un impacto potencial sobre sus territorios tradicionales."

Reiteró la necesidad de que se dé un paso en el ámbito legal, afirmando que "La reglamentación de la consulta otorgaría a estos procesos una mayor certeza y seguridad jurídicas que son necesarias para toda actuación de los poderes públicos.  En este sentido se han declarado organismos internacionales como el Comité para la Eliminación de la Discriminación Racial (CERD), la Comisión de Expertos sobre la Aplicación de Convenios y Recomendaciones Internacionales del Trabajo de la OIT y por la propia Corte de Constitucionalidad de Guatemala.  La mayoría de los actores interesados, incluyendo distintos Ministerios del Gobierno, organizaciones y pueblos indígenas, parecen ahora estar de acuerdo con la necesidad de avanzar urgentemente hacia ese objetivo."
Graham Hunt
Como se reportó en la Prensa Libre y La Hora, el acto de protesta en la capital se vio reflejado en una conferencia de prensa llevada a cabo por parte de CPO y ADH en el departamento de Huehuetenango, donde 30 de 32 municipios han realizado consultas comunitarias en las cuales la población ha rechazado rotundamente toda clase de operación minera.  Como reportado en la Prensa Libre, Francisco Morales de la ADH el rechazo de la agrupación hacia la iniciativa del gobierno, diciendo que "Dicha reglamentación obedece a intereses de las clases poderosas, y por eso no permitiremos que entre en vigor, pues las consultas comunitarias no se negocian, ya que nacen de los pueblos y son procesos de verdadera democracia que buscan exponer el punto de vista de las poblaciones relacionadas principalmente a temas de la explotación minera, la construcción de hidroeléctricas y megaproyectos".

El palacio estaba vigilada por una gran delegación de agentes de la Policía Nacional Civil. Graham Hunt
 En un comunicado de prensa, el Consejo de Pueblos de Occidente (CPO) manifestó que "La intención de reglamentar el Derecho a la Consulta contenido en el Convenio 169 de la OIT, es arbitraria, contradice la esencia misma de este instrumento y vulnera, por parte del Estado de Guatemala, principios del derecho internacional".  CPO también expresó que "Que de aprobarse el reglamento se estaría tergiversando, restringiendo y vulnerando el espíritu del Convenio en muchas de sus intenciones, afectando con ello derechos fundamentales de los pueblos indígenas contenidos en este instrumento internacional, entre otros, el derecho a la consulta, a las formas propias de organización social, al derecho a procedimientos propios y al territorio."  CPO concluye "QUe interpretamos esta intención como un acto de mala fe y racista que con aparente deseo de cumplimiento de las obligaciones internacionales del Estado, disfraza mecanismos que violentan nuestros derechos y busca consolidar intereses económicos particulares nacionales y extranjeros".

Graham Hunt
De igual forma, en un comunicado de prensa, el Consejo de Pueblos K'ichés exigió al gobierno "Respetar y no violentar los sistemas ancestrales de consulta", así como "Respetar los resultados de las consultas comunitarias de buena fe [ya] realizadas a lo largo y a lo ancho de Ixim Uleu (el nombre K'iché para el territorio que actualmente conforma la nación de Guatemala)", y "Desistir de la intención de de 'reglamentar el proceso de las consultas', con la intencionalidad de la actual propuesta de del presidente de la república".

Alcaldes comunitarios y dirigentes de consejos de desarrollo sostienen varas, palos ceremoniales que simbolizan su autoridad comunitaria. Graham Hunt
Por su parte, la Coordinación y Convergencia Nacional Maya Waqib' Kej manifestó, por medio de su propio comunicado de prensa, que "El ejercicio de la consulta es una práctica ancestral de los pueblos indígenas que nunca ha sido reconocida por el Estado de Guatemala.  Ahora la propuesta de agilizar el procedimiento de consulta a los pueblos indígenas es de interés político y económico del sector privado, que obliga al gobierno a limitar los derechos indígenas para proteger a las empresas transnacionales que actualmente explotan grandes extensiones de tierras en Quiché, Huehuetenango, San Marcos, Sacatepéquez, Guatemala, Chimaltenango, Alta Verapaz, Jalapa, Jutiapa, Santa Rosa, Petén e izabal, en sí, todo el territorio nacional.  Asimismo, mediante este reglamento se pretende garantizar a futuro seguir explotando los territorios comunales que históricamente son propiedades de los pueblos Indígena: Mayas, Xincas y Garifunas".

Graham Hunt

Organizaciones, entre ellas el Consejo de Pueblos K'ichés, la Coordinadora Nacional de Viudas (CONAVIGUA) y la Coordinación y Convergencia Nacional Maya Waqib' Kej, fueron vedadas el acceso al palacio nacional. Graham Hunt

Graham Hunt

Graham Hunt

El Presidente Colom de la Unidad Nacional de Esperanza se dirige a los invitados a la desvelación oficial de la propuesta gubernamental por regular las consultas comunitarias en Guatemala. Pancho Guindon
 
Miembros del Colectivo MadreSelva levantaron una pancarta exigiendo respeto a las consultas comunitarias celebradas a lo largo y a lo ancho de Guatemala, bloqueando estratégicamente las cámaras de los periodistas filmando el evento para la televisión. Pancho Guindon

Pancho Guindon

Habiendo sido vedados la entrada en la parte frontal del Palacio, los delegados solicitaron permiso para entrar via la entrada dorsal.  Una vez más fueron vedados, y abogados acompañantes de las organizaciones interpusieron una denuncia ante la Procuraduría para los Derechos Humanos, alegando que habían sido discriminados por su calidad de personas indígenas. Graham Hunt

Graham Hunt

Graham Hunt





En un acto de protesta, comunitarios quemaron una copia impresa del reglamento propuesto por el gobierno de Colom. Graham Hunt